Australia’s best result ever from a Universiade

The Uniroos have enjoyed their most successful World University Games in history in at the 27th Summer Universiade in Kazan, Russia.

The 202 strong delegation, including 151 athletes, placed 10th on the medal tally, our highest finish ever.

2013-07-19 Universiade Aus

The four gold, two silver medals and four bronze equalled our highest ever total from Shenzhen with an aggregate of 16 in the biggest Games ever.

The Universiade is the second biggest multi-sports event in the world, and from Australia’s delegation our future Olympic hopes lie after the most amount of gold medals ever won at a World University Games.

Chef de Mission Martin Roberts, a dual Australian Olympian and Commonwealth Games gold medallist has been changing the perception of the Games since being called upon by Australian University Sports in 2008.

He is proud to have seen the group develop and deliver.

“It is great. We have intelligent people who are really committed to their sport and committed to excellence both as students and athletes,” he said in his final year in the role.

“We have seen a significant increase in the amount of medallists and people involved at the Olympics who are or were student athletes.”

Amoung the gold medalist’s were 21-year-old Samantha Mills, who won the first gold medal of the entire games in the 1m Springboard.

Ryan Napoleon, who competed in the 4x200m relay at the 2012 London Olympics, won gold in the 400m freestyle.

“In all honesty, it is probably one of the best teams I have been on. I didn’t make the world championship team, and I was a little bit disappointed about that,” Napolean said.

“The Universiade is just as much as the Olympics were.”

Other gold medallists included Benjami Treffers in the men’s 50m backstroke, Justi James in the Men’s 200m Individual Medley and Madison Wilson in the women’s 200m backstroke.

While Catherine Skinner, one of the best women’s trap shooters in the world, also won gold.

Thomas Dullard (AUS) – YRP

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